Nov
20
2008

Q & A

This is the forum for interacting.
If you have a question that interests you, please leave it here and I’ll get back to you.

Written by Keith Molloy in: |

25 Comments »

  • Jon

    I will be the first. I would like to hear the importance of eating breakfast, at an older age. Any direct impact on hormonal response, like in infants and teenagers?

    Also, what are the other added benefits for breakfast at a 40+ years of age?

    Jon
    http://www.studlete.com

    Comment | December 3, 2008
  • Jon,
    Thanks for your comment, it’s a very good question. Two of the things that are important to the 40+ crowd are; 1) more energy 2) managing their weight or losing weight. Starting your day with a quality breakfast (eggs, oatmeal, protein shake w/ a banana)is critical to both of those factors. You need quality calories throughout the day, but especially after many hours without a meal. Having consistent quality calories will allow your body to trust you to burn calories, and prevent you from getting that lull during your day. Two macronutrients most people fall short of are protein and water. Early in the day is best for unprocessed complex carbs for fuel as well.
    Live Right, Keith

    Comment | December 3, 2008
  • Hi Keith..great website!
    Is it better to eat frequent through-out the day, as opposed to 2 or 3 larger meals per day?
    Also, how important is cardio in my fitness program? Should I do all my cardio first, mix it in during my strength training, or at the end?
    Is there a test I can have done to determine my heart-rate zones? Where can I have it done?
    thanks!

    Comment | December 16, 2008
  • Kathleen,
    Thank you for your questions.
    1) I would suggest eating smaller meals every 3 hours. Your body needs vege’s (5-7 servings), fruits (2/ day), protein (30 grams at each meal depending on your goals & bodyweight), water (weight X .66 oz./ day) and unprocessed carbs.
    2)Cardio is essential to a strong cardio respiratory system. How much volume, intensity and duration would depend on your goals and medical history. Intervals are a great way of strengthening your heart and burning calories all day long. Finding out your parameters would take some testing. You will also need some active recovery cardio to allow enough rest between the challenging intervals for optimum growth & recovery.
    3)There is a great cardio assessment called the Conconi Protocol. It marries together the Karvonen Formula with Perceived Exertion (RPE- Borg Scale). We do that kind of testing & programming at my club, Test Sports Club in Tinton Falls. Call or stop in and ask for Keith, Bob or Kathleen.
    live right, Keith

    Comment | December 17, 2008
  • rbs1175

    Hi Keith—

    Randi told me about your blog- as you can imagine I am very exited to read through it. Good Luck and I am sure I will have comments and questions to add soon.

    Take care,
    Robyn

    Comment | January 15, 2009
  • Robyn,
    Hi, how are you & Lance? Yes, please check out the site. There is lots of great info and video. This site is to help enrich my relationships with my clients and their friends & family. At some point I will have e books for sale, and then instructional DVD’s. Right now it’s fun, educational and motivational.
    Sincerely, Keith

    Comment | January 15, 2009
  • Robyn

    Hi Keith,

    I hope you had a good weekend.
    Lance and I were with my parents this weekend and my dad brought up how he has not played tennis in 3 years for many reasons which he can expand on. He mentioned having lost all muscle tone. I suggested strength training and you. He needs overall conditioning as he gets older. My dad has a flexible schedule. I suggested 2x a week for 30 minutes. (Stretching, Cardio, Strength) Not an intense program but something to get him started. I can have him call you direct but thought I would help make the introduction.
    Talk to you soon,
    Robyn

    Comment | January 19, 2009
  • Robyn,
    I happen to be going through a transition right now, converting my hour pt sessions to 40 minutes. That might be perfect for your Dad. I would include; strength, foam rolling, corrective exercises (based on his FMS test score, and I could give him some base cardio stuff to do on his own here. So my clients are still here for an hour, but I train them for 40 minutes ($45). After he built up a cardio base, I could introduce him to intervals and tennis appropriate agility work.
    Sincerely, Keith

    Comment | January 19, 2009
  • Robyn

    Keith,
    I will tell him to give you a call. That way you can directly figure out the best time for him to come in and meet you and see the facility.

    Thanks,
    Robyn

    Comment | January 19, 2009
  • Robyn

    Hi Keith,

    I hope things are going well training my dad.

    a friend asked me a question and used the word “toning” I don’t want to give her the wrong feedback. She said to me – Low weight, high reps = toning. I don’t really use that word but before answering her is that an accurate statement?

    Thanks,
    Robyn

    Comment | March 4, 2009
  • Hi Robyn,
    I hope that you & Lance are doing well, I miss seeing you guys.
    Training w/ your Dad are going well from my perspective. I think he’s enjoying it so far. I’m taking it slowly with him and explaining everything thoroughly. We haven’t really started talking/bonding yet, but I’m sure that will come.
    Re: your friend’s question. I hate the term “toning”, just like I don’t care for “cardio”. Both give people the vision of easy lifting, or easy walking. Improvement comes from variety & progression from wherever that person begins from. To change your body takes a consistent, intense, disciplined approach. if your friend wants to see toned muscles she needs to eat better, work intensely for shorter periods of time. Have her check out some of the info & videos on http://www.keithmolloy.com. if she’s a beginner it will take time to build a base. Then she will need to change the stimulus to see improvement. Maybe she should hire a trainer for a short while, like you (I mean hire you)!
    I hope that this helps.
    Keith

    Comment | March 4, 2009
  • Hello Keith,

    I have some questions about muscle gains in my thighs from (possibly) too many squats/lunges with weights. There was a workout program I started, fairly intense, that uses the premise of “muscle burns fat.” With that, I was lifting a bit heavier than normal weights, using slow repetitions and really working my muscles to exhaustion. It incorporated a lot of multi-joint exercises – lots of squats/lunges – all good stuff. However within three weeks of the program, my clothes (pants specifically) were all tighter on me. It very quickly changed my shape, gave me a bit of a “j-lo tush” which wasn’t bad, just uncomfortable wearing my clothes a bit tighter. I also noticed my legs were getting bigger. I know this can happen initially, however after 3-4 weeks of it, thought I would slightly lean down again. And to add, my diet was mostly clean as it typically is, and I eat approx 5 times per day, small healthy meals, lots of water, etc.

    So here’s my questions – at what point could you say are squats/lunges too much? I stopped the particular program and now just do the workouts sporadically as I did enjoy them, however my thighs are still a bit bigger than normal – again, uncomfortable. I’m hesitant on doing too many squats and lunges now, but not sure what’s enough/too much/too little. This has happened before – and in the past, I incorporated more cardio than normal in my routine (interval training, jump training, bike riding, long walks, etc.) and watched my nutrition a bit closer until I got back to my comfort zone again. What are your thoughts?

    Thanks for your input,
    Sheryl

    Comment | April 5, 2009
  • Sheryl,
    The good news is your great genetic ability to put on muscle. The bad news is, you aren’t interested in that. You want to be fit, lean and athletic looking. The best way to do that is to do full body, functional (a lot of muscle is integrated in the movement) exercises that ellicit an anaerobic response & activates the central nervous system. To state that simply- you want to use exercises like; push ups, chin ups (both can be modified for ability), squats, lunges, step ups, box jumps, etc- these movements create a high heart rate and that “jittery” feeling. That causes you to become more aerobically fit, stronger, and more importantly for your goals-leaner! Why? Because those types of workouts cause a post exercise fat burn. That’s right- you burn fat over the next 24-48 hours in response to that stimulus, after you leave the gym.
    The training that you were doing-slow strength training- is an excellent way to add muscle. The other part of the equation is the foods that you eat. You want; lean proteins, 2-3 fruits per day, lots of veges and unprocessed carbs (baked or sweet potatoes, brown rice, oatmeal, plus lots of water (your weight X .66 oz. per day).
    Keith

    Comment | April 9, 2009
  • Maria Molloy Lenzsch

    Maria Molloy Lenzsch Hey Keith,
    I didn’t no you were a personal trainer. I have been trying for ever to get back in shape by walking every morning. I don’t lift weights because i have two hernated disc in my neck and I am limited to exercises. When I found out that it wasn’t all body fat and that my body was swallow from all the wheat products I have been eating and went on the gluten free diet I lose alot of it. I would love to lose more of the body fat and get in better shape. If you could be of any help please don’t hesiate.

    Take care,
    Maria

    Comment | July 17, 2009
  • Maria,
    You made a very good move finding out about your gluten issue. i would say that when it comes to weight loss, nutrition is the most important issue. Having lean organic proteins, fruits & veges, lots of water, and eating unprocessed carbs in the way to go for most people.

    As far as exercise is concerned, intensity is the key. You have to appropriately introduce strength training and cardio intervals.

    Maria, with your medical history issues, you should seek out a good, experienced personal trainer in your area to teach you how to safely do that. It would also be a good idea to seek out nutrition guidance too. The nutritionist that we work with here has a lot of experience with gluten issues. Check out his website (www.nutritiontreatmentcenter.com) and see if he can lead you in the right direction nutritionally.

    Best of luck, Keith

    Comment | July 20, 2009
  • Maria Molloy Lenzsch

    Thank you Keith I will do that!!1

    Comment | July 20, 2009
  • James A.

    Hey Keith,
    As you know Jon Kalnas has put together a cardio program for me. It is designed for me in order that I can burn fat. In addition I have been doing strength taining to further the process. My question to you is …..What is push and pull and shopuld I be alternating each time I strength train?

    Thanks,
    James Ateniese

    Comment | December 3, 2009
  • James,
    Since getting fit and lean are your goals, I wouldn’t split up your strength training into push & pull (I’ll get into that explanation in a moment). Stick with full body workouts, using moderate weight for now, with a volume of 3-4 sets per movement. Movements; upper body pushing (chest or shoulder pressing movements), upper body pulling (modified pullups, lat pulls, rows, pullovers), lower body pushing (squats, deadlifts, step ups, lunges), lower body pulling (RDL’s, PB leg curls, machine leg curls, Bulgarian Split Squats), linear & rotational ab work.

    Back to push/ pull, as you can see, I showed you all the different movement patterns-people that want to do push/pull would simply pick; chest, shoulders tri’s (pushing), then back bi’s (pulling), and legs & abs.

    As your body progresses, your goals might change, then we’ll evolve your program.
    Keith

    Comment | December 5, 2009
  • Gaelle

    Hi Keith,
    Love your site and your you tube clips re: Power Plate.
    I reside in CT and have just purchased a WBV machine similar to the Power Plate for home use. What is the best way to use the machine for warm ups? In the past, I was using a Power Plate at a gym and I would always do at least 10 minutes of warm up on a “cardio” type machine so that I had a good flow of blood and oxygen levels. I wonder what I can do at home to mimic that before I use my WBV for squats, push ups, crunches etc…
    Thank you in advance for any advice you might have.
    Gaelle

    Comment | January 30, 2010
  • Hi Gaelle,
    Thanks for writing, and it’s a good question. I usually incorporate the WBV after a general warm up (3-5 min of moderate cardio equipment) & dynamic warm up (hip crossovers, iron cross, pillar & glute bridges, world’s greatest stretch, hand walks). I have my clients perform an isometric circuit; pushup position w/ elbows bent, squat position, downward dog position).
    I also use WBV for strength, massage, power…..but mostly as the warm up I described.
    I hope that helps you.
    Keith

    Comment | January 30, 2010
  • keith molloy

    hi Keith
    my name is also Keith Molloy and at the moment i am studying to become a personal trainer in Ireland, as you no there is a lot of learning to do so i was just wondering if you had any tips or help for someone about to do there exams and hopefully start their own personal training business, what would they be

    Comment | April 4, 2011
  • Hi Keith,
    Pretty cool, meeting my namesake, who also wants to be in the same business. I have been in the business my whole adult life (27+ yrs). I think a 4 year degree is the most important thing. But there are several very good certifications out there; NSCA’s CPT (National Strength & Conditioning Association’s Certified Personal Trainer), also NASM is very good (National Academy of Sports Medicine).
    I started by working for other businesses, and learning what I thought would work & what I didn’t like. Then I had a clientele that I worked with in homes & other people’s gyms. Then I opened a small (@500 sq ft) training gym, before we moved to where we are now (7000 sq ft gym). If you are going to travel to the US I’d be happy to meet with you. My family & I are planning a trip to Ireland in either 2011, or 2012. Where do you live?

    Other intangibles to think about- you should love the work, you should be in great shape (you should never give someone a workout that you haven’t done already yourself), you should like being with people & helping them attain their goals, you better like working a lot of hours (that’s why you should love the work).
    My email is – keithmolloy@juno.com
    Sincerely, Keith

    Comment | April 5, 2011
  • keith molloy

    thanks for that advice i live in cork its in the south of Ireland , i forgot to mention that the course im doing is a night school as i work during the day and is itec but im also doing the ACSM (American collage of sports medicine) personal training course,i plan to hopefully get experience in a gym while working on getting a client base and eventually owning my own gym, i also plan to take further courses and hopefully in the next few years i will be certified in cardiac rehab as this is a hugely untapped market here in Ireland

    Comment | April 5, 2011
  • Keith-
    the ACSM certification is an excellent one
    it sounds like you have an excellent plan for your future
    best of luck
    when we visit Ireland I’ll send out a tweet, maybe we can meet…if it’s a southern tour of Ireland (we’ll do some form of a group trip..I don’t think I’m ready for driving through your country on my own)
    be well
    Keith

    Comment | April 6, 2011
  • Jim Hodge

    Keith,

    This is a follow-up from our conversation about a few 1-hour sessions at my company, Vencore Labs, near GSP exit 109 on Newman Springs Road.

    Jim
    jhodge@vencorelabs.com

    Comment | May 25, 2017

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